1. Articles from Big Think

    bigthink.com

  2. 1-24 of 30 1 2 »
    1. How 15-Minute Boredom Sessions Can Help You Manage Stress and Emotions

      How 15-Minute Boredom Sessions Can Help You Manage Stress and Emotions

      If you want to know the state of a nation, we generally look no further than online. A proper portrait, that does not yield. Look, instead, at the line in front of you, waiting for a cappuccino or to pay for groceries. Look into the cars surrounding you at a red light. Look around anywhere in the public space, except at your phone. Then you’ll get a sense of where our heads are at.

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    2. A.I. Will Serve Humans—But Only About 1% of Them

      A.I. Will Serve Humans—But Only About 1% of Them

      It doesn’t have to be this way, but for now it is: AI’s primary purpose is to maximize profits. For all of the predictions of its benefits to society, right now, that’s just window-dressing—a pie-in-the-sky vision of a world we don’t actually inhabit. While some like Elon Musk issue dire warnings against finding ourselves beneath the silicon thumbs of robot overlords, the fact is we’re already under threat.

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    3. How Traveling Abroad Changes Your Outlook on the World for the Better

      How Traveling Abroad Changes Your Outlook on the World for the Better

      When the term “armchair” is applied to a job title, it’s almost always derogatory. An armchair general, for example, refers to someone who considers himself an expert on military matters even though he’s never seen combat, or perhaps even served in the military. It implies a critical lack of real-world experience.

      Considering that the United States remains the world's only superpower, that begs the question: How informed are Americans when it comes to their country's vast global power?

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    4. Economics and Politics: Depressing, Right? Not So, Say Young People

      Economics and Politics: Depressing, Right? Not So, Say Young People

      Despite a growing sense of unease at the uncertainties of modern society—from turbulent political events to widening income inequality—youth around the world continue to be very optimistic, a large global survey concludes.

      Taken in 45 cities across 32 countries between November 2016 and January 2017, the survey gathered responses from 7,394 individuals aged 18-24. It was carried out by the international research firm Ipsos as part of Citi Foundation’s Pathways to Progress initiative.

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    5. Are We Born Optimistic? Or Is It a Coping Skill We Learn as Adults?

      Are We Born Optimistic? Or Is It a Coping Skill We Learn as Adults?

      LORI MARKSON: As a developmental psychologist who studies cognition in children we were really excited to be able to focus on a particular aspect of a cognitive bias, which is the development of optimism in children.

      So we’re often studying cognitive mechanisms and how children are using these to reason about various aspects of the world around them, including other people’s thoughts and preferences.

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    6. Why Adults Need to Play More Often

      Why Adults Need to Play More Often

      People take fitness seriously. Those ten thousand steps. Marathon over, time to tackle the ultra-marathon. Pounds upon pounds on the squat rack—just make sure to post it or it never happened. And yoga, well, people take their yoga very seriously.

      Taking health seriously is wonderful, arguably better than not considering it at all. That said, one of the greatest joys of exercise is play. Your workout should be hard, otherwise you’ll plateau and never grow stronger.

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    7. This Is How You Can Become a Damn Good Writer

      This Is How You Can Become a Damn Good Writer

      The rhythm of a good sentence moves through you as powerfully as a solid beat. It can cause you to fall silent, placing the book face down, pages spread, to contemplate the vast sweep of life, all thanks to the combination of a few simple words. It can call you to action, creating a swell of motor neurons dictating forward momentum. A dopamine cascade tingling the extremities of limbs and minds when the puzzle pieces of language fit together in just the right form.

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    8. There Are "Two Halves" To Great Design, Says iPod Co-Designer

      There Are "Two Halves" To Great Design, Says iPod Co-Designer

      Posting and discussing examples of bad design has recently become a curiously popular online hobby. The subreddit r/crappydesign, perhaps the mecca of ridiculing design faux pas, boasts nearly 700,000 subscribers and features posts like an elevator with completely unordered buttons and a height chart that's placed several feet off the ground. (r/crappydesign's motto, for the record, is: "MAY THE COMIC SANS AND LENS FLARES FLOW UNFILTERED}".)

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    9. How Some Myths about the Brain Just Don't Go Away

      How Some Myths about the Brain Just Don't Go Away

      Some commonly held ideas about what we know about the brain are nothing more than myth, and a new study recently published in Frontiers of Psychology has set out to disprove these falsehoods despite their prevalence in culture.

      Our infant daughter spent years with her face pressed up against our TV screen supposedly having her learning capacity expanded through classical music and “stimulating images” delivered to her by a then-popular video series, Baby Einstein.

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    10. Women in Countries With More Gender Equality Have Better Cognitive Health

      Women in Countries With More Gender Equality Have Better Cognitive Health

      The extent of gender equality in a country can affect women's cognitive health. Such is the conclusion of a new study that looked at how the cognitive functioning of women changed over time based on where they lived.

      The lead author of the study, Eric Bonsang of University Paris-Dauphine and Columbia University, said this is the first attempt to shed light on the negative consequences that gender inequality has on women's health later in life.

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    11. What the Early Life of Steve Jobs Can Teach Us About Success

      What the Early Life of Steve Jobs Can Teach Us About Success

      Steve Jobs is one of the most admired and admonished figures of the technological age. With his razor sharp focus on his work, continuous quest for perfection, unapologetic behavior, selfishness at times, seeming disregard for the feelings of others, and absolute dedication to his life's work, he is like the hero of an Ayn Rand novel. His life, character, achievements and failures are repeatedly debated by admirers and critics alike.

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    12. Trump and Brexit: How Cognitive Elitism Caused Nations to Divide

      Trump and Brexit: How Cognitive Elitism Caused Nations to Divide

      DAVID GOODHART: My book is basically about the value divides in modern societies. I focused a lot on Britain, but I think a lot of it applies to America too. And I'm talking about not so much the kind of elite/non-elite divide—when we talk about elites we often mean I think the top three or five percent of the population—I’m talking about a much bigger divide between the educated and often mobile people, who I call the “Anywheres,” who tend to value openness, autonomy, fluidity—they can surf social change comfortably, they tend not to ...

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    13. High School, College, Career. Simple, Right? Not Any More.

      High School, College, Career. Simple, Right? Not Any More.

      It used to be so simple: Graduate high school, get into a decent university, graduate, and start cashing your paycheck. For more and more people though, that’s just a story about how things used to be. McGraw-Hill Education Executive Jeff Livingston says that — ironically — the only people who think it’s still true are those who’ve gone into Education. Unfortunately, they’re the ones setting education policy in the U.S.

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    14. Here's When Machines Will Take Your Job, as Predicted by AI Gurus

      Here's When Machines Will Take Your Job, as Predicted by AI Gurus

      While technology develops at exponential speed, transforming how we go about our everyday tasks and extending our lives, it also offers much to worry about. In particular, many top minds think that automation will cost humans their employment, with up to 47% of all jobs gone in the next 25 years. And chances are, this number could be even higher and the massive job loss will come earlier.

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    15. Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent?

      Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent?

      Observe the behavior of shoppers in a long supermarket line or drivers snarled in traffic, and you can quickly become disillusioned about humanity and its collective IQ. Reality TV and websites like People of Walmart inflame this consideration. Lots of songs, both popular and underground, even utter the phrase “only stupid people are breeding.” Apparently, many of us can relate.

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    16. MDMA and Psilocybin: The Future of Anxiety Medication?

      MDMA and Psilocybin: The Future of Anxiety Medication?

      When my wife texted me from the other side of the apartment last Thursday I knew things could not be good. Four simple words: Chris Cornell is dead. While I haven’t remained up on Soundgarden or Cornell’s solo career over the last two decades, Badmotorfinger and Superunknown, along with the Temple of the Dog record, were essential high school and college listening, memories for life.

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    17. Want People to Believe Fake News? Repeat it Often, Says New Study.

      Want People to Believe Fake News? Repeat it Often, Says New Study.

      Do you want people to believe a lie online? Just repeat it over and over.

      Familiarity influences the spreading of fake news online, concludes a new study from Yale University researchers. The study analyzed highly implausible and partisan fake news headlines that were spread online in recent months. While many studies have examined the "illusory truth effect," this was the first empirical investigation of the psychology of fake news.

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    1-24 of 30 1 2 »
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